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CONNOR PR PROUD TO BE WORKING WITH TACKLE PROSTATE CANCER AND LAUNCH THEIR INAUGURAL CAMPAIGN

TACKLE LAUNCHES INAUGURAL CAMPAIGN

‘CYCLE TO THE MOON’ TO HELP RAISE AWARNESS OF PROSTATE CANCER

 

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer, the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK, has announced their inaugural national cycling event ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ – a major fundraising initiative that will encourage people of all ages to get on their bikes and raise awareness and money for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

 

Cycle to the Moon is a chance for members of the public to show their support through their cycling miles either on the roads, in the gym, at home or on outdoor trails throughout the month of May 2018. The event is open to all ages regardless of ability. It is designed to be a fun, healthy activity raising funds on behalf of Tackle Prostate Cancer as well as encouraging the next generation to participate. It also aims to raise awareness and encourage men at risk of prostate cancer to get tests and earlier diagnosis. The campaign’s target is £250,000 – £1 for every mile between Earth and the Moon.

 

Roger Wotton chairman of Tackle Prostate Cancer says: “We know how devastating the diagnosis of prostate cancer can be. Raising awareness and funds through this campaign will hopefully see more men being tested earlier, and help accelerate a reduction in mortality figures. Prostate cancer doesn’t just affect the man diagnosed – it affects his whole family.”

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer is a patient-led charity addressing the real issues people face when they are diagnosed with prostate cancer, and helping people to cope with their diagnosis and treatment. As a National Federation, Tackle has 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members.

Cycle to the Moon ambassador, vocal coach and TV presenter David Grant, said:

“Prostate cancer does not care who it affects or the devastation it causes to patients and their families. It’s a cause close to my heart as my cousin was diagnosed, so I want to urge you to make a difference and get on your bikes and clock up some miles. One man dying every 45 minutes is a startling figure and we all need to do what we can to reduce mortality figures. This is a chance for members of the public to fight this cancer. The event is open to all ages regardless of abilities, it is designed as a fun and healthy activity whilst at the same time raising funds for Tackle Prostate Cancer.”

Prostate cancer is now a bigger killer than breast cancer. making prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the UK. Every penny raised will make a difference, lives will be saved and more people will be aware of the need to be tested. The money will help the charity continue to meet its objectives of campaigning on behalf of patients and raising awareness in the community. It will also enable the ‘Save a Dad’ initiative to be followed through in secondary schools where the aim is to get a discussion on prostate cancer in the National Curriculum, just as breast cancer is included today. Working through secondary schools Tackle would like to make teenagers aware that prostate cancer will impact 1 in 8 of their dads. The charity hopes that by educating the next generation about the importance of men being tested earlier it can help “Save a Dad”.

Professor Frank Chinegwundoh MBE, Consultant Urological Surgeon, Barts Health NHS Trust, Chairman, Tackle Clinical Advisory Board said: “Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK.  Unfortunately many men are unaware of this fact and unaware that there is a blood test, PSA, that is an indicator of their risk.  The ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ initiative will raise children’s awareness and thus their fathers. Undoubtedly, lives will be saved.  Knowledge is power.”

Lord Rose, Ambassador for Tackle Prostate Cancer said: “One in eight men in the UK will develop Prostate Cancer. Tackle’s initiative ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ is an exciting fundraising event which aims, through schools, to raise awareness in the next generation and hopefully see more men at risk of prostate cancer having an earlier diagnosis.”

 

If you would like to get involved please go to: http://cycletothemoon.tackleprostate.org/ where you can download a fundraising pack full of great ideas and tips to get cycling for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Email: saveadad@tackleprostate.org

 

-Ends-

 

Notes to editors

Media information: For images, interviews or case studies, or if you have a story please contact Siobhan Connor at Connor PR siobhan@connorpr.com Tel 07966177025

For information on support groups, prostate cancer and testing days, visit www.tackleprostate.org.

Join the conversation: Please use our #SAVEADAD on social media to show your support.

FB: https://www.facebook.com/tackleprostate/

Twitter: @tackleprostate

Instagram: tackle_prostate_cancer

About Tackle

Tackle is the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK. As a National Federation, we only exist by virtue of our 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members. Effective communications is a challenge, not just in dealings with the media, but also in making sure our organisation stays in touch with its grass roots – patients!

So, how do we approach this challenge? Our overall strategy has three themes – Supporting Patients, Raising Awareness and Campaigning on Issues.

 

In the UK:

  • 1 man dies every 45 minutes from prostate cancer
  • 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime and 1 in 4 black men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives. Black men are more likely to get prostate cancer than other men.
  • You are more at risk of prostate cancer if:
  • you are aged 45 or over – and your risk increases as you get older
  • your father or brother has had it.
  • If you’re overweight or obese, you might have a higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer that’s aggressive (more likely to spread) or advanced (spread outside the prostate).
  • If you’re a black man over 45, speak to your GP about your risk of prostate cancer

TACKLE LAUNCHES INAUGURAL CAMPAIGN

‘CYCLE TO THE MOON’ TO HELP RAISE AWARNESS OF PROSTATE CANCER

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer, the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK, has announced their inaugural national cycling event ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ – a major fundraising initiative that will encourage people of all ages to get on their bikes and raise awareness and money for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Cycle to the Moon is a chance for members of the public to show their support through their cycling miles either on the roads, in the gym, at home or on outdoor trails throughout the month of May 2018. The event is open to all ages regardless of ability. It is designed to be a fun, healthy activity raising funds on behalf of Tackle Prostate Cancer as well as encouraging the next generation to participate. It also aims to raise awareness and encourage men at risk of prostate cancer to get tests and earlier diagnosis. The campaign’s target is £250,000 – £1 for every mile between Earth and the Moon.

 

Roger Wotton chairman of Tackle Prostate Cancer says: “We know how devastating the diagnosis of prostate cancer can be. Raising awareness and funds through this campaign will hopefully see more men being tested earlier, and help accelerate a reduction in mortality figures. Prostate cancer doesn’t just affect the man diagnosed – it affects his whole family.”

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer is a patient-led charity addressing the real issues people face when they are diagnosed with prostate cancer, and helping people to cope with their diagnosis and treatment. As a National Federation, Tackle has 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members.

 

 

Cycle to the Moon ambassador, vocal coach and TV presenter David Grant, said:

 

“Prostate cancer does not care who it affects or the devastation it causes to patients and their families. It’s a cause close to my heart as my cousin was diagnosed, so I want to urge you to make a difference and get on your bikes and clock up some miles. One man dying every 45 minutes is a startling figure and we all need to do what we can to reduce mortality figures. This is a chance for members of the public to fight this cancer. The event is open to all ages regardless of abilities, it is designed as a fun and healthy activity whilst at the same time raising funds for Tackle Prostate Cancer.”

 

Prostate cancer is now a bigger killer than breast cancer. making prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the UK. Every penny raised will make a difference, lives will be saved and more people will be aware of the need to be tested. The money will help the charity continue to meet its objectives of campaigning on behalf of patients and raising awareness in the community. It will also enable the ‘Save a Dad’ initiative to be followed through in secondary schools where the aim is to get a discussion on prostate cancer in the National Curriculum, just as breast cancer is included today. Working through secondary schools Tackle would like to make teenagers aware that prostate cancer will impact 1 in 8 of their dads. The charity hopes that by educating the next generation about the importance of men being tested earlier it can help “Save a Dad”.

 

Professor Frank Chinegwundoh MBE, Consultant Urological Surgeon, Barts Health NHS Trust, Chairman, Tackle Clinical Advisory Board said: “Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK.  Unfortunately many men are unaware of this fact and unaware that there is a blood test, PSA, that is an indicator of their risk.  The ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ initiative will raise children’s awareness and thus their fathers. Undoubtedly, lives will be saved.  Knowledge is power.”

 

Lord Rose, Ambassador for Tackle Prostate Cancer said: “One in eight men in the UK will develop Prostate Cancer. Tackle’s initiative ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ is an exciting fundraising event which aims, through schools, to raise awareness in the next generation and hopefully see more men at risk of prostate cancer having an earlier diagnosis.”

 

If you would like to get involved please go to: http://cycletothemoon.tackleprostate.org/ where you can download a fundraising pack full of great ideas and tips to get cycling for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Email: saveadad@tackleprostate.org

 

-Ends-

 

Notes to editors

 

Media information: For images, interviews or case studies, or if you have a story please contact Siobhan Connor at Connor PR siobhan@connorpr.com Tel 07966177025

 

For information on support groups, prostate cancer and testing days, visit www.tackleprostate.org.

 

Join the conversation: Please use our #SAVEADAD on social media to show your support.

 

FB: https://www.facebook.com/tackleprostate/

Twitter: @tackleprostate

Instagram: tackle_prostate_cancer

 

 

About Tackle

Tackle is the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK. As a National Federation, we only exist by virtue of our 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members. Effective communications is a challenge, not just in dealings with the media, but also in making sure our organisation stays in touch with its grass roots – patients!

So, how do we approach this challenge? Our overall strategy has three themes – Supporting Patients, Raising Awareness and Campaigning on Issues.

 

In the UK:

  • 1 man dies every 45 minutes from prostate cancer
  • 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime and 1 in 4 black men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives. Black men are more likely to get prostate cancer than other men.
  • You are more at risk of prostate cancer if:
  • you are aged 45 or over – and your risk increases as you get older
  • your father or brother has had it.
  • If you’re overweight or obese, you might have a higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer that’s aggressive (more likely to spread) or advanced (spread outside the prostate).
  • If you’re a black man over 45, speak to your GP about your risk of prostate cancer

 

TACKLE LAUNCHES INAUGURAL CAMPAIGN

‘CYCLE TO THE MOON’ TO HELP RAISE AWARNESS OF PROSTATE CANCER

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer, the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK, has announced their inaugural national cycling event ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ – a major fundraising initiative that will encourage people of all ages to get on their bikes and raise awareness and money for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Cycle to the Moon is a chance for members of the public to show their support through their cycling miles either on the roads, in the gym, at home or on outdoor trails throughout the month of May 2018. The event is open to all ages regardless of ability. It is designed to be a fun, healthy activity raising funds on behalf of Tackle Prostate Cancer as well as encouraging the next generation to participate. It also aims to raise awareness and encourage men at risk of prostate cancer to get tests and earlier diagnosis. The campaign’s target is £250,000 – £1 for every mile between Earth and the Moon.

 

Roger Wotton chairman of Tackle Prostate Cancer says: “We know how devastating the diagnosis of prostate cancer can be. Raising awareness and funds through this campaign will hopefully see more men being tested earlier, and help accelerate a reduction in mortality figures. Prostate cancer doesn’t just affect the man diagnosed – it affects his whole family.”

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer is a patient-led charity addressing the real issues people face when they are diagnosed with prostate cancer, and helping people to cope with their diagnosis and treatment. As a National Federation, Tackle has 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members.

 

 

Cycle to the Moon ambassador, vocal coach and TV presenter David Grant, said:

 

“Prostate cancer does not care who it affects or the devastation it causes to patients and their families. It’s a cause close to my heart as my cousin was diagnosed, so I want to urge you to make a difference and get on your bikes and clock up some miles. One man dying every 45 minutes is a startling figure and we all need to do what we can to reduce mortality figures. This is a chance for members of the public to fight this cancer. The event is open to all ages regardless of abilities, it is designed as a fun and healthy activity whilst at the same time raising funds for Tackle Prostate Cancer.”

 

Prostate cancer is now a bigger killer than breast cancer. making prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the UK. Every penny raised will make a difference, lives will be saved and more people will be aware of the need to be tested. The money will help the charity continue to meet its objectives of campaigning on behalf of patients and raising awareness in the community. It will also enable the ‘Save a Dad’ initiative to be followed through in secondary schools where the aim is to get a discussion on prostate cancer in the National Curriculum, just as breast cancer is included today. Working through secondary schools Tackle would like to make teenagers aware that prostate cancer will impact 1 in 8 of their dads. The charity hopes that by educating the next generation about the importance of men being tested earlier it can help “Save a Dad”.

 

Professor Frank Chinegwundoh MBE, Consultant Urological Surgeon, Barts Health NHS Trust, Chairman, Tackle Clinical Advisory Board said: “Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK.  Unfortunately many men are unaware of this fact and unaware that there is a blood test, PSA, that is an indicator of their risk.  The ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ initiative will raise children’s awareness and thus their fathers. Undoubtedly, lives will be saved.  Knowledge is power.”

 

Lord Rose, Ambassador for Tackle Prostate Cancer said: “One in eight men in the UK will develop Prostate Cancer. Tackle’s initiative ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ is an exciting fundraising event which aims, through schools, to raise awareness in the next generation and hopefully see more men at risk of prostate cancer having an earlier diagnosis.”

 

If you would like to get involved please go to: http://cycletothemoon.tackleprostate.org/ where you can download a fundraising pack full of great ideas and tips to get cycling for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Email: saveadad@tackleprostate.org

 

-Ends-

 

Notes to editors

 

Media information: For images, interviews or case studies, or if you have a story please contact Siobhan Connor at Connor PR siobhan@connorpr.com Tel 07966177025

 

For information on support groups, prostate cancer and testing days, visit www.tackleprostate.org.

 

Join the conversation: Please use our #SAVEADAD on social media to show your support.

 

FB: https://www.facebook.com/tackleprostate/

Twitter: @tackleprostate

Instagram: tackle_prostate_cancer

 

 

About Tackle

Tackle is the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK. As a National Federation, we only exist by virtue of our 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members. Effective communications is a challenge, not just in dealings with the media, but also in making sure our organisation stays in touch with its grass roots – patients!

So, how do we approach this challenge? Our overall strategy has three themes – Supporting Patients, Raising Awareness and Campaigning on Issues.

 

In the UK:

  • 1 man dies every 45 minutes from prostate cancer
  • 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime and 1 in 4 black men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives. Black men are more likely to get prostate cancer than other men.
  • You are more at risk of prostate cancer if:
  • you are aged 45 or over – and your risk increases as you get older
  • your father or brother has had it.
  • If you’re overweight or obese, you might have a higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer that’s aggressive (more likely to spread) or advanced (spread outside the prostate).
  • If you’re a black man over 45, speak to your GP about your risk of prostate cancer

 

 

TACKLE LAUNCHES INAUGURAL CAMPAIGN

‘CYCLE TO THE MOON’ TO HELP RAISE AWARNESS OF PROSTATE CANCER

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer, the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK, has announced their inaugural national cycling event ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ – a major fundraising initiative that will encourage people of all ages to get on their bikes and raise awareness and money for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Cycle to the Moon is a chance for members of the public to show their support through their cycling miles either on the roads, in the gym, at home or on outdoor trails throughout the month of May 2018. The event is open to all ages regardless of ability. It is designed to be a fun, healthy activity raising funds on behalf of Tackle Prostate Cancer as well as encouraging the next generation to participate. It also aims to raise awareness and encourage men at risk of prostate cancer to get tests and earlier diagnosis. The campaign’s target is £250,000 – £1 for every mile between Earth and the Moon.

 

Roger Wotton chairman of Tackle Prostate Cancer says: “We know how devastating the diagnosis of prostate cancer can be. Raising awareness and funds through this campaign will hopefully see more men being tested earlier, and help accelerate a reduction in mortality figures. Prostate cancer doesn’t just affect the man diagnosed – it affects his whole family.”

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer is a patient-led charity addressing the real issues people face when they are diagnosed with prostate cancer, and helping people to cope with their diagnosis and treatment. As a National Federation, Tackle has 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members.

 

 

Cycle to the Moon ambassador, vocal coach and TV presenter David Grant, said:

 

“Prostate cancer does not care who it affects or the devastation it causes to patients and their families. It’s a cause close to my heart as my cousin was diagnosed, so I want to urge you to make a difference and get on your bikes and clock up some miles. One man dying every 45 minutes is a startling figure and we all need to do what we can to reduce mortality figures. This is a chance for members of the public to fight this cancer. The event is open to all ages regardless of abilities, it is designed as a fun and healthy activity whilst at the same time raising funds for Tackle Prostate Cancer.”

 

Prostate cancer is now a bigger killer than breast cancer. making prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the UK. Every penny raised will make a difference, lives will be saved and more people will be aware of the need to be tested. The money will help the charity continue to meet its objectives of campaigning on behalf of patients and raising awareness in the community. It will also enable the ‘Save a Dad’ initiative to be followed through in secondary schools where the aim is to get a discussion on prostate cancer in the National Curriculum, just as breast cancer is included today. Working through secondary schools Tackle would like to make teenagers aware that prostate cancer will impact 1 in 8 of their dads. The charity hopes that by educating the next generation about the importance of men being tested earlier it can help “Save a Dad”.

 

Professor Frank Chinegwundoh MBE, Consultant Urological Surgeon, Barts Health NHS Trust, Chairman, Tackle Clinical Advisory Board said: “Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK.  Unfortunately many men are unaware of this fact and unaware that there is a blood test, PSA, that is an indicator of their risk.  The ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ initiative will raise children’s awareness and thus their fathers. Undoubtedly, lives will be saved.  Knowledge is power.”

 

Lord Rose, Ambassador for Tackle Prostate Cancer said: “One in eight men in the UK will develop Prostate Cancer. Tackle’s initiative ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ is an exciting fundraising event which aims, through schools, to raise awareness in the next generation and hopefully see more men at risk of prostate cancer having an earlier diagnosis.”

 

If you would like to get involved please go to: http://cycletothemoon.tackleprostate.org/ where you can download a fundraising pack full of great ideas and tips to get cycling for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Email: saveadad@tackleprostate.org

 

-Ends-

 

Notes to editors

 

Media information: For images, interviews or case studies, or if you have a story please contact Siobhan Connor at Connor PR siobhan@connorpr.com Tel 07966177025

 

For information on support groups, prostate cancer and testing days, visit www.tackleprostate.org.

 

Join the conversation: Please use our #SAVEADAD on social media to show your support.

 

FB: https://www.facebook.com/tackleprostate/

Twitter: @tackleprostate

Instagram: tackle_prostate_cancer

 

 

About Tackle

Tackle is the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK. As a National Federation, we only exist by virtue of our 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members. Effective communications is a challenge, not just in dealings with the media, but also in making sure our organisation stays in touch with its grass roots – patients!

So, how do we approach this challenge? Our overall strategy has three themes – Supporting Patients, Raising Awareness and Campaigning on Issues.

 

In the UK:

  • 1 man dies every 45 minutes from prostate cancer
  • 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime and 1 in 4 black men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives. Black men are more likely to get prostate cancer than other men.
  • You are more at risk of prostate cancer if:
  • you are aged 45 or over – and your risk increases as you get older
  • your father or brother has had it.
  • If you’re overweight or obese, you might have a higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer that’s aggressive (more likely to spread) or advanced (spread outside the prostate).
  • If you’re a black man over 45, speak to your GP about your risk of prostate cancer

TACKLE LAUNCHES INAUGURAL CAMPAIGN

‘CYCLE TO THE MOON’ TO HELP RAISE AWARNESS OF PROSTATE CANCER

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer, the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK, has announced their inaugural national cycling event ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ – a major fundraising initiative that will encourage people of all ages to get on their bikes and raise awareness and money for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Cycle to the Moon is a chance for members of the public to show their support through their cycling miles either on the roads, in the gym, at home or on outdoor trails throughout the month of May 2018. The event is open to all ages regardless of ability. It is designed to be a fun, healthy activity raising funds on behalf of Tackle Prostate Cancer as well as encouraging the next generation to participate. It also aims to raise awareness and encourage men at risk of prostate cancer to get tests and earlier diagnosis. The campaign’s target is £250,000 – £1 for every mile between Earth and the Moon.

 

Roger Wotton chairman of Tackle Prostate Cancer says: “We know how devastating the diagnosis of prostate cancer can be. Raising awareness and funds through this campaign will hopefully see more men being tested earlier, and help accelerate a reduction in mortality figures. Prostate cancer doesn’t just affect the man diagnosed – it affects his whole family.”

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer is a patient-led charity addressing the real issues people face when they are diagnosed with prostate cancer, and helping people to cope with their diagnosis and treatment. As a National Federation, Tackle has 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members.

 

 

Cycle to the Moon ambassador, vocal coach and TV presenter David Grant, said:

 

“Prostate cancer does not care who it affects or the devastation it causes to patients and their families. It’s a cause close to my heart as my cousin was diagnosed, so I want to urge you to make a difference and get on your bikes and clock up some miles. One man dying every 45 minutes is a startling figure and we all need to do what we can to reduce mortality figures. This is a chance for members of the public to fight this cancer. The event is open to all ages regardless of abilities, it is designed as a fun and healthy activity whilst at the same time raising funds for Tackle Prostate Cancer.”

 

Prostate cancer is now a bigger killer than breast cancer. making prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the UK. Every penny raised will make a difference, lives will be saved and more people will be aware of the need to be tested. The money will help the charity continue to meet its objectives of campaigning on behalf of patients and raising awareness in the community. It will also enable the ‘Save a Dad’ initiative to be followed through in secondary schools where the aim is to get a discussion on prostate cancer in the National Curriculum, just as breast cancer is included today. Working through secondary schools Tackle would like to make teenagers aware that prostate cancer will impact 1 in 8 of their dads. The charity hopes that by educating the next generation about the importance of men being tested earlier it can help “Save a Dad”.

 

Professor Frank Chinegwundoh MBE, Consultant Urological Surgeon, Barts Health NHS Trust, Chairman, Tackle Clinical Advisory Board said: “Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK.  Unfortunately many men are unaware of this fact and unaware that there is a blood test, PSA, that is an indicator of their risk.  The ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ initiative will raise children’s awareness and thus their fathers. Undoubtedly, lives will be saved.  Knowledge is power.”

 

Lord Rose, Ambassador for Tackle Prostate Cancer said: “One in eight men in the UK will develop Prostate Cancer. Tackle’s initiative ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ is an exciting fundraising event which aims, through schools, to raise awareness in the next generation and hopefully see more men at risk of prostate cancer having an earlier diagnosis.”

 

If you would like to get involved please go to: http://cycletothemoon.tackleprostate.org/ where you can download a fundraising pack full of great ideas and tips to get cycling for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Email: saveadad@tackleprostate.org

 

-Ends-

 

Notes to editors

 

Media information: For images, interviews or case studies, or if you have a story please contact Siobhan Connor at Connor PR siobhan@connorpr.com Tel 07966177025

 

For information on support groups, prostate cancer and testing days, visit www.tackleprostate.org.

 

Join the conversation: Please use our #SAVEADAD on social media to show your support.

 

FB: https://www.facebook.com/tackleprostate/

Twitter: @tackleprostate

Instagram: tackle_prostate_cancer

 

 

About Tackle

Tackle is the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK. As a National Federation, we only exist by virtue of our 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members. Effective communications is a challenge, not just in dealings with the media, but also in making sure our organisation stays in touch with its grass roots – patients!

So, how do we approach this challenge? Our overall strategy has three themes – Supporting Patients, Raising Awareness and Campaigning on Issues.

 

In the UK:

  • 1 man dies every 45 minutes from prostate cancer
  • 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime and 1 in 4 black men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives. Black men are more likely to get prostate cancer than other men.
  • You are more at risk of prostate cancer if:
  • you are aged 45 or over – and your risk increases as you get older
  • your father or brother has had it.
  • If you’re overweight or obese, you might have a higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer that’s aggressive (more likely to spread) or advanced (spread outside the prostate).
  • If you’re a black man over 45, speak to your GP about your risk of prostate cancer

 

TACKLE LAUNCHES INAUGURAL CAMPAIGN

‘CYCLE TO THE MOON’ TO HELP RAISE AWARNESS OF PROSTATE CANCER

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer, the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK, has announced their inaugural national cycling event ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ – a major fundraising initiative that will encourage people of all ages to get on their bikes and raise awareness and money for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Cycle to the Moon is a chance for members of the public to show their support through their cycling miles either on the roads, in the gym, at home or on outdoor trails throughout the month of May 2018. The event is open to all ages regardless of ability. It is designed to be a fun, healthy activity raising funds on behalf of Tackle Prostate Cancer as well as encouraging the next generation to participate. It also aims to raise awareness and encourage men at risk of prostate cancer to get tests and earlier diagnosis. The campaign’s target is £250,000 – £1 for every mile between Earth and the Moon.

 

Roger Wotton chairman of Tackle Prostate Cancer says: “We know how devastating the diagnosis of prostate cancer can be. Raising awareness and funds through this campaign will hopefully see more men being tested earlier, and help accelerate a reduction in mortality figures. Prostate cancer doesn’t just affect the man diagnosed – it affects his whole family.”

 

Tackle Prostate Cancer is a patient-led charity addressing the real issues people face when they are diagnosed with prostate cancer, and helping people to cope with their diagnosis and treatment. As a National Federation, Tackle has 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members.

 

 

Cycle to the Moon ambassador, vocal coach and TV presenter David Grant, said:

 

“Prostate cancer does not care who it affects or the devastation it causes to patients and their families. It’s a cause close to my heart as my cousin was diagnosed, so I want to urge you to make a difference and get on your bikes and clock up some miles. One man dying every 45 minutes is a startling figure and we all need to do what we can to reduce mortality figures. This is a chance for members of the public to fight this cancer. The event is open to all ages regardless of abilities, it is designed as a fun and healthy activity whilst at the same time raising funds for Tackle Prostate Cancer.”

 

Prostate cancer is now a bigger killer than breast cancer. making prostate cancer the third biggest cancer killer in the UK. Every penny raised will make a difference, lives will be saved and more people will be aware of the need to be tested. The money will help the charity continue to meet its objectives of campaigning on behalf of patients and raising awareness in the community. It will also enable the ‘Save a Dad’ initiative to be followed through in secondary schools where the aim is to get a discussion on prostate cancer in the National Curriculum, just as breast cancer is included today. Working through secondary schools Tackle would like to make teenagers aware that prostate cancer will impact 1 in 8 of their dads. The charity hopes that by educating the next generation about the importance of men being tested earlier it can help “Save a Dad”.

 

Professor Frank Chinegwundoh MBE, Consultant Urological Surgeon, Barts Health NHS Trust, Chairman, Tackle Clinical Advisory Board said: “Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK.  Unfortunately many men are unaware of this fact and unaware that there is a blood test, PSA, that is an indicator of their risk.  The ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ initiative will raise children’s awareness and thus their fathers. Undoubtedly, lives will be saved.  Knowledge is power.”

 

Lord Rose, Ambassador for Tackle Prostate Cancer said: “One in eight men in the UK will develop Prostate Cancer. Tackle’s initiative ‘Cycle to the Moon, Save a Dad’ is an exciting fundraising event which aims, through schools, to raise awareness in the next generation and hopefully see more men at risk of prostate cancer having an earlier diagnosis.”

 

If you would like to get involved please go to: http://cycletothemoon.tackleprostate.org/ where you can download a fundraising pack full of great ideas and tips to get cycling for the fight against prostate cancer.

 

Email: saveadad@tackleprostate.org

 

-Ends-

 

Notes to editors

 

Media information: For images, interviews or case studies, or if you have a story please contact Siobhan Connor at Connor PR siobhan@connorpr.com Tel 07966177025

 

For information on support groups, prostate cancer and testing days, visit www.tackleprostate.org.

 

Join the conversation: Please use our #SAVEADAD on social media to show your support.

 

FB: https://www.facebook.com/tackleprostate/

Twitter: @tackleprostate

Instagram: tackle_prostate_cancer

 

 

About Tackle

Tackle is the voice of prostate cancer patients and their families in the UK. As a National Federation, we only exist by virtue of our 90 support groups across the country, representing some 15,000 members. Effective communications is a challenge, not just in dealings with the media, but also in making sure our organisation stays in touch with its grass roots – patients!

So, how do we approach this challenge? Our overall strategy has three themes – Supporting Patients, Raising Awareness and Campaigning on Issues.

 

In the UK:

  • 1 man dies every 45 minutes from prostate cancer
  • 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime and 1 in 4 black men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lives. Black men are more likely to get prostate cancer than other men.
  • You are more at risk of prostate cancer if:
  • you are aged 45 or over – and your risk increases as you get older
  • your father or brother has had it.
  • If you’re overweight or obese, you might have a higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer that’s aggressive (more likely to spread) or advanced (spread outside the prostate).
  • If you’re a black man over 45, speak to your GP about your risk of prostate cancer

 

#Prostate Cancer #Cycle to the Moon #PSA #1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer #Siobhan Connor #Connor PR charity PR #Siobhan Connor Charity PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALAN WHICKER COLLECTION NOW AVAILBLE TO VIEW AT BFI SOUTHBANK AS PART OF LATEST ACQUISITIONS EXHIBITION

 

ALAN WHICKER COLLECTION NOW AVAILBLE TO VIEW AT BFI SOUTHBANK AS PART OF LATEST ACQUISITIONS EXHIBITION

Inside Whicker’s World: The life and travels of Alan Whicker

wwf-logo-blue

 

  • Alan Whicker collection on view now as part of an exhibition of material from the BFI National Archive’s Special Collections; ‘Latest Acquisitions is free to view in the Mezzanine Gallery at BFI Southbank until October 23
  • Items on display include Alan Whicker’s passports, a BBC Audience report for Whicker Down Under, interview question cards for Papa Doc: The Black Sheep (1969) and The World of James Bond (1967), photographs, correspondence, and shooting schedules
  • Test your knowledge by taking part in a travel quiz made by the Whicker’s World Foundation – https://whickersworldfoundation.com/2016/10/quiz-how-well-do-you-know-whickers-world/
  • Submissions for Whicker’s World Foundation Awards 2017 are now being accepted

As well as caring for one of the world’s richest and most significant moving image collections, the BFI National Archive also holds world-class Special Collections of scripts, posters, designs, photographs and other documents, including the archives of some of Britain’s most important film and programme makers. This exhibition presents highlights from some of our exciting recent acquisitions including the papers of Oscar-winning costume designer Jenny Beavan, television journalist and documentary-maker Alan Whicker, and S John Woods, the man behind many of the best-loved Ealing Studios posters. The exhibition is open now and free to view until October 23rd 2016 at BFI Southbank, Mezzanine Gallery, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XT.

 

The BFI National Archive is now home to the archives of pioneering investigative TV journalist, Alan Whicker, donated by Valerie Kleeman, Whicker’s World Foundation. The collection contains meticulous records of one of the most enduring and influential careers in British television history, spanning the late 1950s into the 21st century.

 

This is an extensive and significant donation covering the entire career of a world-renowned broadcaster, and represents a unique insight into the production methods of a master documentarian. Alan Whicker’s name is a by-word for brilliantly crafted and revealing studies of people and places, whether exploring behind the scenes of the Miss World competition, interviewing Papa Doc in Haiti, or exposing the lifestyles of the hippies of San Francisco, with an enquiring mind and a sceptical tone. This unlikely figure, clad in Gucci tie and blazer, found his way into the nation’s hearts as he went where his audience was unlikely to follow.

 

The meticulously kept Alan Whicker archive spans the years 1938-2014. It includes a school report from 1938, documents relating to his war career and letters, photographs, extensive production files, audience reports, interview notes and questions (including Whicker’s hand-annotated question cards) and transcripts of every TV programme he made, along with some, as yet, unidentified films. The archive gives an insider’s view of some of the key events, social trends and personalities of the 20th century, while fully documenting the changing world of television reportage across more than five decades.

 

 

Around Whicker’s World in 13 Guesses

Test your knowledge of Alan Whicker’s Life and Work by taking part in our quiz

https://whickersworldfoundation.com/2016/10/quiz-how-well-do-you-know-whickers-world/

 

Submissions for Whicker’s World Foundation Awards 2017 are now being accepted

 

The Funding Award

This is the primary focus of Whicker’s World Foundation. Each year £80,000 will be awarded to a new director with the most promising pitch for an authored documentary which fulfils the core criteria of the Foundation and can be completed for screening with this award. The money will be paid in instalments to the director’s film company, enabling a project which deserves to reach as wide an audience as possible. This year it was won by Alex Bescoby for Burma’s Lost Royals. The closing date for entries is 31st January 2017 and the shortlists will be announced in May 2016. Entrants must be aged 35 years or younger on the closing date for applications. The first winners will be announced by Whicker’s World Foundation at the Sheffield Doc/Fest Award Ceremony, which will take place on the final night of the 2017 festival, 13th June 2017.

 

The Whicker’s World Radio and Audio Funding Award (RAFA)

For 2017 we are introducing a new Funding Award for Radio and Audio documentary projects in association with the Radio Academy. This is for a documentary, 15 minutes or over, broadcast or published online in the previous year. The Whicker’s World Radio and Audio Funding Award (RAFA) has a £5,000 first prize and £2,000 runner up award. The deadline for this award is the 23rd of December, with the best pitch being announced at a special event in March 2017.

 

 

The Recognition Awards

In addition to our funding awards there are two further annual prizes to recognise completed work: the ‘Audio Award’ and the ‘Sage Award’, the latter of which is for the finest industry newcomer over the age of fifty.

Alan worked in radio before TV and was snapped up by Radio 2 in the late 1990s, adding what Jim Moir, the Controller from 1996 to 2003, described as “great lustre to my network”. Initially Alan’s radio programmes revolved around re-visiting his most memorable encounters from Whickers World: from the ‘Ten Pound Poms’ to Margaret Rutherford’s transsexual adoptee who ‘gave birth’ to a mixed-race daughter in South Carolina. He went on to create a radio history of television called Itll Never Last.

Whicker’s World Foundation will award an annual £5,000 prize for the best audio project of over 15 minutes in length, broadcast in the last year. A runner-up will receive £2,000.

The Whicker’s World Sage Award

‘Retirement’ was not a word in Alan’s vocabulary. He was 83 when he wrote and presented Whicker’s War, a much acclaimed account of his army experiences in Italy for Channel 4. He made his last series for BBC Two, Journey of a Lifetime, in his late eighties. The Sage award will recognise a TV or audio professional who has come to air with an authored story for the first time, a prize of £5,000 will be awarded annually to an applicant aged 50 plus. Submissions of no more than 10 minutes; this can be for presentation but must be their own work. A runner-up will receive £2,000. Keith Earnest Hoult won this award for for Fluechtlinge – Refugee. Keith, a fan of Alan Whicker’s ‘gentle approach’ to interviewing, was inspired to create a ten-minute film about Syrians seeking refuge in a disused airport used for the Berlin Airlift. When he witnessed his friend’s wife Caroline trying to help refugees against a growing backlash he ‘felt the urge to film it if only for her family to reflect on later in life’. Keith learnt his film-making skills at the SAE Institute after redundancy and divorce turned his life upside-down. Judges were impressed that he made this entirely self-funded film as ‘a simple tale of ordinary people helping other ordinary people at their time of most desperate need.’

 

For further details on the awards and entry forms please go to

www.whickersworldfoundation.com

 

-ENDS

 

Notes to editors:

 

For images, media information and interviews please contact:

Siobhan Connor at Connor PR siobhan@connorpr.com   + 44 (0) 7966 177025

 

For Terms and Conditions and award Criteria please go to http://whickersworldfoundation.com/application-forms/

Join the conversation: facebook.com/whickersworldfoundation

https://twitter.com/whickersworld   @whickersworld

 

About Whicker’s World Foundation

On 7 June 2015 Whicker’s World Foundation, whose principle aim is to give a much needed fillip to authored documentary storytelling in the UK, launched three new documentary awards worth over £100,000 for the promotion of curiosity in programme making, generously funded by a legacy left by the celebrated broadcast journalist Alan Whicker. The launch took place in the Sheffield Winter Gardens led by Alex Graham, chair or Doc/Fest, Jane Ray, Artistic Director for the foundation and Kim Longinotto, multi award winning filmmaker. Entries for 2017 Awards opened on September 26th 2016 www.whickersworldfoundation.com

ALAN WHICKER COLLECTION DONATED TO BFI NATIONAL ARCHIVE

ALAN WHICKER COLLECTION

DONATED TO BFI NATIONAL ARCHIVE

London – Thursday, 5th May 2016. The BFI National Archive is pleased to announce that it has received the archives of pioneering investigative TV journalist, Alan Whicker, donated by Valerie Kleeman, Whicker’s World Foundation. The collection contains meticulous records of one of the most enduring and influential careers in British television history, spanning the late 1950s into the 21st century.

 

This is an extensive and significant donation covering the entire career of a world-renowned broadcaster, and represents a unique insight into the production methods of a master documentarian. Alan Whicker’s name is a by-word for brilliantly crafted and revealing studies of people and places, whether exploring behind the scenes of the Miss World competition, interviewing Papa Doc in Haiti, or exposing the lifestyles of the hippies of San Francisco, with an enquiring mind and a sceptical tone. This unlikely figure, clad in Gucci tie and blazer, found his way into the nation’s hearts as he went where his audience was unlikely to follow.

 

The meticulously kept Alan Whicker archive spans the years 1938-2014. It includes a school report from 1938, documents relating to his war career and letters, photographs, extensive production files, audience reports, interview notes and questions (including Whicker’s hand-annotated question cards) and transcripts of every TV programme he made, along with some, as yet, unidentified films. The archive gives an insider’s view of some of the key events, social trends and personalities of the 20th century, while fully documenting the changing world of television reportage across more than five decades.

 

The material will be stored at the BFI National Archive’s paper store at Berkhamsted where it joins over 600 named collections from individuals such as producers Michael Balcon, David Puttnam and Betty Box, directors including David Lean, Joseph Losey, Michael Powell, Carol Reed, Mike Hodges, Muriel Box and Derek Jarman, writers such as Emeric Pressburger, Janet Green and Trevor Griffiths, and documentary filmmakers such as Humphrey Jennings, Derek Armstrong and Michael Orrom. Among the most recent additions to the collection are the archives of Ken Loach, Alan Parker, Jenny Beavan, Richard Lester, Karel Reisz, Jack Clayton and Halas & Batchelor. The Whicker papers will be able to be consulted by researchers and students of television history once cataloguing is fully completed.

 

Robin Baker, Head Curator, BFI National Archive said, “This is a major collection that gives us a unique insight into one of the great figures of 20th century television. Alan Whicker was a household name, famed for his daring and insightful investigations of people from all walks of life, from close to home and around the globe. His standards were meticulously high and his programmes set a benchmark for longform television documentary. The Alan Whicker collection is a very generous and important donation from Valerie Kleeman of the Whicker’s World Foundation, for which we are extremely grateful. We’re delighted that Whicker’s papers are now part of the national collection of film and television. “

 

Valerie Kleeman, Whicker’s partner in life and work for over 40 years and founder of the Whicker’s World Foundation said, “The Whicker’s World archive is now where it belongs – in the safekeeping of the BFI – where, I hope, its content will be of help and guidance to generations to come.

 

The 90 boxes, carefully curated by archivist Catherine Kirby, contain an intimate and personal take on the last half of the 20th century. Beginning with a letter informing him he has passed his School Certificate and continuing throughout his life in the Army Film and Photographic Unit, journalism and television, Alan Whicker observed both the light and the shadows of life.

 

Often he witnessed history in the making: war trials in Strasbourg, race riots in Alabama. He had access to the unaccessible: dictators, witch doctors, cults – and even the occasional royal. ‘Whicker’s World’ covered everything from bullfighting and the first gay weddings to the horrors of Papa Doc’s Haiti, always with intelligence, often with humour.

 

Whicker wrote and filmed what he saw, he had no preconceived ideas, no axe to grind. His motivation was to stimulate, to interest, to entertain…..and to allow viewers to come to their own conclusions.

 

The archive contains 60 years of carefully documented work: transcripts, notes, diaries and photographs, a lifetime of watching the world through thoughtful, quizzical eyes.”

 

 

Alan Whicker CBE (1921-2013) was a renowned journalist, broadcaster and television presenter. During the Second World War he joined the Army Film and Photo Unit, and by the 1950s he was working as a foreign correspondent for a Fleet Street agency, and then as a broadcaster for BBC Radio. In 1957 he was spotted by producer Alasdair Milne (later Director-General of the BBC) who gave him a regular ‘Whicker’s World’ slot on the ground breaking Tonight programme. This paved the way for the longer format Whicker’s World which began in 1965 and ran for 40 years on the BBC and ITV.

 

His reportage spanned the globe and covered a huge range of subjects which reflect all aspects of 20th century culture, politics and history. These include race relations, gay marriage, gun culture, bullfighting, haute couture and interviews with significant (and often controversial) figures of the 20th century, for example, Francois Duvalier (‘Papa Doc’), the notorious Haitian dictator, and oil billionaire John Paul Getty. At the height of his popularity Whicker’s programmes commanded audiences of 15 million people. Whicker’s work was also significant in terms of style and format, for example, he was an early pioneer of the ‘blue light’ programme, a format that is now well-established and perennially popular (shadowing police in their daily and nightly duties). Alan Whicker is a significant cultural figure and a household name for a whole generation. He won many awards during his career including the BAFTA Richard Dimbleby Award and the Screenwriters’ Guild Best Documentary Script (in 1963). His legacy lives on through the Whicker’s World Foundation which supports new documentary talent.

 

About the BFI

The BFI is the lead organisation for film in the UK with the ambition to create a flourishing film environment in which innovation, opportunity and creativity can thrive by:

  • Connecting audiences to the widest choice of British and World cinema
  • Preserving and restoring the most significant film collection in the world for today and future generations
  • Championing emerging and world class film makers in the UK – investing in creative, distinctive and entertaining work
  • Promoting British film and talent to the world
  • Growing the next generation of film makers and audiences

 

The BFI is a Government arm’s-length body and distributor of Lottery funds for film. The BFI serves a public role which covers the cultural, creative and economic aspects of film in the UK. It delivers this role:

  • As the UK-wide organisation for film, a charity core funded by Government
  • By providing Lottery and Government funds for film across the UK
  • By working with partners to advance the position of film in the UK.

 

Founded in 1933, the BFI is a registered charity governed by Royal Charter.

 

The BFI Board of Governors is chaired by Josh Berger.

 

About the BFI National Archive

The BFI National Archive was founded in 1935 and has grown to become the one of the largest and most important collections of film and television in the world with over 180,000 films and 750,000 television programmes. For over 80 years the BFI has been an international leader in film preservation and guardian of Britain’s unparalleled film and TV heritage. The BFI is an innovator in presenting films to audiences in new and dynamic ways, from cinemas to film festivals, outdoor events to online video-on-demand. At the heart of all its activities is the BFI’s central aim to ensure that everyone in the UK has access to the widest possible range of film and their own film heritage.

That heritage includes all time great British directors Alfred Hitchcock, David Lean and Powell and Pressburger; and the rich vein of documentary filmmaking, in which Britain led the world, including the lyrical work of Humphrey Jennings. The archive also boasts a significant collection of filmmakers’ papers as well as extensive stills, posters and production and costume designs along with original scripts, press books and related ephemera.

Expert teams undertake the time-consuming and complex task of restoring films at the BFI John Paul Getty Jr Conservation Centre in Hertfordshire. The BFI’s most precious film materials are kept in optimum conditions in the world-leading Master Film Store in Warwickshire.

 

Stills

A selection of stills for press use in connection with this story can be found at:

www.image.net/BFI/BFI National Archive/Whicker

 

 

Press contacts:

 

Brian Robinson, Communications Manager, Archive & Heritage, BFI

Email: brian.robinson@bfi.org.uk

Tel  +44 (0) 207 957 8940

Mobile: 07740 171968

 

Judy Wells, Head of Press and PR , BFI

Email: judy.wells

Tel +44 (0) 207 957 8919

Mobile: 07984 180501

 

 

For press enquiries about Whicker’s World Foundation please contact:

 

Siobhan Connor CONNOR PR +44 (0)7966 177025 siobhan@connorpr.com

 

 

 

 

 

PUSSIES GALORE: THE WOMAN WITH A THOUSAND CATS

PUSSIES GALORE: THE WOMAN WITH A THOUSAND CATS 

Friday 18th September, 8:00pm – 9.00pm

Channel 5

Katie Glazier

There are over 9 millions cats in our UK homes, with most owners living with a single feline friend, however for someone just isn’t enough. In this extraordinary one hour programme we meet some of the most fanatical kitty lovers who have taken their love one step further. We meet a woman who can’t stop taking local strays in, a man with a cat tattoo obsession, we get an insight into the world of cat competitions and we visit a unique establishment that allows you to enjoy your food whilst stroking a pussy.

 

Lynea Lattanzio is the embodiment of a crazy cat lady, she has over 1000 cats on her premises and is still unable to say no to more. What started off as company for the divorced retiree, has now spiralled into taking over her whole existence.

 

Lynea was refused a cat as a child and has been working hard since, making up for lost time. We visit her Californian home and see her surrounded by her furry family, witnessing just how she manages to keep things ticking. With a thousand cats on the property is it all getting too much for Lynea or will she always be thinking of the many more roaming the streets?

 

From Crazy Cat Lady to Crazy Cat Man, we meet pussy magnet Andy Richards who has spent the last 20 years of his life dedicating his time to helping cats. Andy, the manager of the East Lancashire Cats charity store and owner of 18 of his own, has now racked up 40 cat related tattoos! We join Andy as he embarks upon his latest design, as he goes under the needle for two more tatts. Will Andy’s cat inking obsession come to an end or will he run out of space first?

 

Later in the episode we meet up with some UK based cat crazies as we discover the world of the Cat Competition. We follow Sue Miller from Devon, a self admitted cat obsessive, who is taking seven of her eighteen cats to the West of England and South Wales Cat Society Show in hope of adding to her vast collection of ribbons and rosettes. We see the preparation, the judging and the results and find out just how much her little superstars winning means to her. Will the pressures of the competition get too much for Sue or will see come away with more accolades?

 

In the final instalment of the hour we enter a unique establishment that allows people to eat their lunch and drink a coffee surrounded by their favourite feline. We meet Katie Jane Glazier who has opened up Newcastle’s first of its kind, the Cat Café called Mog on the Tyne! In a café influenced by its phenomenon success in Japan, you can now eat your lunch at the same time as stroking a pussy. Will Katie’s unique business venture be a roaring success or will it be doomed to failure?

-Ends-

Connor PR specialist in TV programme promotion, Connor PR working with Channel 5, Connor PR expert in entertainment PR

 

Very sad to hear about the death of TV psychic Colin Fry who I worked with at Living TV on Most Haunted & 6ixth Sense

I worked with Colin Fry for over 5 years launching his programmes on Living TV.

One very proud moment was landing a five page feature in The coolest magazine of the day The Face back in the early noughties

The Face 1The Face 2The Face 3The Face 5

Colin Fry, who has died aged 53, was a self-proclaimed medium who relayed messages from “the dead” to audiences in Australia, New Zealand, Norway and Japan; on British satellite television he featured in such “paranormal reality” shows as Most Haunted and 6ixth Sense.

Viewers hoping for dire warnings from beyond the grave would be disappointed. A warm and charismatic performer, Fry’s stage pronouncements tended towards the prosaic. Bereaved grandchildren were instructed to tidy their rooms; dead parents reassured their offspring that the end had been relatively peaceful.

Sceptics countered that Fry’s main talent lay in basic “cold reading” techniques – the art of analysing body language in order to make high-probability guesses about a person. In 1992 Fry was caught out at a seance when the lights were turned on unexpectedly, revealing that he was still holding a “spirit trumpet” that was meant to be suspended in mid-air. Fry later put the incident down to his relative inexperience at the time. He also denied any suggestions of exploitation, pointing to his training as a bereavement counsellor. Members of his audience were encouraged to seek professional help if Fry felt they were struggling to cope with their loss.

Though he had initially refused to appear on television on the grounds that most programmes made fun of spiritualism, Fry gave in when he was approached by producers at the age of 40. The format of the shows, however, tended once again towards the banal. A message broadcast before 6ixth Sense admitted that “differing opinions exist as to the true nature of clairvoyance and clairaudience”. None the less, the subject has proved adaptable to the small screen. Most Haunted completed its 17th series in 2015.

Colin Fry was born on May 19 1962 in Haywards Heath, West Sussex. His mother, Margaret, a student nurse, had intended to remain at home after the birth but suffered from post-partum depression and decided that work would be beneficial. Colin was raised in large part by his maternal grandmother, Lilian, with whom he shared a close – he would say psychic – bond.

From an early age, Colin became aware of an ability to perceive things that other members of his family could not. A vision of an old man – “like a taller, slightly thinner version of [Doctor Who] William Hartnell” – at the foot of his bed was a first glimpse of “Magnus”, who would become Fry’s proclaimed “spirit guide” in adulthood. Aged four, Colin announced to the table at teatime that “Old Nanny”, his great-grandmother, had died. A telegram to that effect arrived the next day.

After leaving school at 16 without any qualifications, Fry worked in the retail industry while giving demonstrations at spiritualist churches. But it was not until his stepbrother, Michael, died of Aids in 1996 that he resolved to become a full-time medium. Fry had nursed Michael for many years, and saw a chance to keep the relationship intact. “But he’s very clever,” he explained in 2003: “He’ll often pass messages to me through other mediums.”

Fry went on to become a reverend of the Spiritualist Church, and wrote several books on spiritual and mental well-being. A memoir, The Happy Medium, was published in 2012. The title seemed to contradict a life that had had its share of physical hardship. He became partially deaf aged 23 and relied on hearing aids in later years. Last April he was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer.

A heavy smoker, he recalled an earlier encounter with a fellow spiritualist, who disapproved: “This old love said to me: ‘That’ll kill you, you know.’ I replied: ‘My love, do you honestly think that bothers me? I know where I’m going.’”

Colin Fry is survived by his civil partner, Mikey.

Colin Fry, born May 19 1962, died August 25 2015 – The Daily Telegraph

Tribute to the Queen of Saturday Night Television from a Blind Date contestant

I am so sad to hear about Cilla Black. She was the queen of Saturday night TV when I was growing up! Blind Date owned Saturday night in the 90s and I was very lucky to be part of it.  Cilla had a great sense of humour and what you saw on television was the real Cilla. There was no pretence about her, she was the queen of entertainment. Like many others, Blind Date helped pave my way for a career in TV and I’m still in touch with some of the production team. I went onto work with Cilla when she launched her own show on Living TV. I was number three and picked by Keith from Dublin. We won a trip to the Turks and Caicos Islands and it was magical.  Flew First Class and Suggs from Madness was on the plane. Happy memories!

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Blind Date 1

Blind Date 13

Siobhan Connor contestant on Blind Date, Siobhan Connor MD of Connor PR pays tribute to Cilla Black,

Whicker’s World Foundation launches new documentary awards at Sheffield Doc Fest

Whicker’s World Foundation launches new documentary

awards at Sheffield Doc Fest

unnamed

  • Three awards worth a total of £100,000

  • Supporting authored storytelling in the UK

  • First winners to be announced at Sheffield Doc/Fest 2016

 

Sunday 7th June at Sheffield Doc/Fest: the new Whicker’s World Foundation, whose principle aim is to give a much needed fillip to authored documentary storytelling in the UK, today launches three new documentary filmmaker awards worth a total of £100,000 for the promotion of curiosity in programme making, generously funded by a legacy left by the celebrated broadcast journalist Alan Whicker, who died in 2013. Details of the Whicker’s World Foundation and the awards will be announced by filmmaker Kim Longinotto at a special event at Doc/Fest, following the screening of Whicker’s World: Conflict in Kentucky.

 

Alan Whicker interviewing Cassius Clay

Says Mark Atkin, Acting Festival Director, Sheffield Doc/Fest: “I am very enthused that this foundation aims to encourage authored documentary at a time when TV is becoming increasingly formatted and when most foundations have requirements to promote social issues. This is exactly what the industry needs right now”.

 

The three awards – the Funding Award (worth £80,000 / £10,000 runner up) to a debut filmmaker under 30 years of age; the Recognition Award (worth £4,000 / £1,000 runner up) to the finest industry newcomer aged 50 years of age or over; and the Best Audio Documentary (worth £4,000 / £1,000) to be awarded at the In The Dark audio festival, also part of Doc/Fest – will be looking for a spirit of inquisitiveness that will leave the viewer wanting more, and tell something new and unexpected about the world.

 

Alan Whicker with Papa Doc

 

The panel of judges, chaired by Valerie Kleeman, photographer, programme consultant and Whicker’s partner for more than 40 years, will also be looking for projects that are playful with how the story is told, either breaking new ground, or taking a familiar path to come up with a new style.

 

The Alan Whicker Foundation consultant, top ranking international TV executive Jane Mote, says: “Whicker’s World opened my eyes to the most amazing stories, people and places. Alan’s unique style and sharp wit was inspirational and I am so excited to be part of creating a Foundation to nurture the future trailblazers for international documentary film-making”.

 

Jane Ray, the Consultant Artistic Director for the Foundation is a multi-award winning documentary maker and executive producer in radio and television with a journalistic background and nearly 28 years’ service at the BBC. Her awards range from the Sony Award for best news programme (2002) and the TRIC award for best children’s programme (1993) to China’s Golden Kapok award for best director (2014). She worked with Alan throughout the 90s on various projects for radio. She also wrote and directed Radio 4’s archive programme about Alan: Around the World in 80 Years, presented by Michael Palin.

 

The first award winners will be announced by the Whicker’s World Foundation at the Sheffield Doc/Fest Award Ceremony, which will take place on the final day of the 2016 festival.

 

Ends

 

For further information for Whicker’s World Foundation contact:

Siobhan Connor siobhan@connorpr.com

+ 44 (0) 7966 177025

 

For further information for Sheffield Doc/Fest contact:

Sarah Harvey Publicity

+44 (0) 207 232 2812

+44 (0) 7958 597426

 

Sarah Harvey sarah@sarahharveypublicity.co.uk

Nikki Cummins nikki@sarahharveypublicity.co.uk

Joe Bond joe@sarahharveypublicity.co.uk

 

 

Join the conversation:

facebook.com/whickersworldfoundation

https://twitter.com/whickersworld

 

About Doc/Fest:

Sheffield Doc/Fest is the UK’s premier documentary and digital media festival. It is the place to see world and UK premieres of the best creative documentaries from the cinema, television and online arenas, and to hear from and meet filmmakers at Q&A sessions. Highlights of the film programme are honoured with an award programme including the Sheffield Grand Jury, Innovation, Environmental, Interactive, Youth Jury, Inspiration, Student Doc, Short Form and Audience Awards. In 2014, 3,263 full festival pass holders attended the Festival and it attracted over 26,700 members of the film-loving public.

Sheffield Doc/Fest 2015 takes place from 5-10 June

 

Connor PR launching the Whicker’s World Foundation, Connor PR expert in travel PR, Connor PR expert in presenter PR, Connor PR specialist in TV publicity

 

Sad day, Loaded magazine to close after 21 years, happy memories of working on the Loaded Lafta’s PR campaign

Loaded magazine to close after 21 years

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2015/mar/27/loaded-

close-21-years-lads-mag?CMP=share_btn_t

I ran the PR campaign for the Loaded Laftas and have many happy memories of working on the magazine

Loaded Lafta Awards

Loaded Lafta Awards

Loaded.co.uk - The original, sexiest and best men's magazine - Index - Loaded Laftas

Loaded Lafta Awards

 

Loaded Lafta Awards

 

 

Once one of the leading titles in a booming lads mag sector, it hit print sales of 350,000 in 2000

 

Loaded, one of the titles synonymous with the mid-1990s lads’ mag boom, is to close after 21 years.

The last issue of the monthly magazine, which launched in 1994, is the April edition which is on sale now.

“As of the current April issue, published on March 26th, Loaded will cease to trade as a printed magazine,” the magazine’s publisher said in a statement. “We would like to pay tribute to our customers, staff and especially our contributors and editorial team”.

Loaded was once one of the the leading titles in a booming lads magazine sector, with sales of 350,000 in 2000.

In recent years the rise of the internet has seen sales plummet, circulation stood at about 35,000 in 2011, the last officially audited figures available for the title.

The magazine is owned by Simian Publishing, a company set up in 2013 for Loaded’s management to take control of the title.

The magazine has had a troubled recent history with four owners in three years and a brief period where it was put in to administration.

Simian acquired the title from Paul Baxendale-Walker, a multi-millionaire businessman who occasionally directs and stars in his own pornographic films, who owned it through Blue Publishing which went in to administration.

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Baxendale-Walker acquired it in 2012 from Cooper Young, the administrators appointed to handle the sale of the magazine after parent company Vitality Publishing ran up a bill of £1m to creditors.

Vitality had acquired Loaded, gay lifestyle title Attitude, Superbike, horoscope title Prediction and Hair magazine from IPC Media, now Time Inc UK, in 2010.

In 2009, Bauer closed men’s monthly Arena after 22 years.

In the same year Dennis Publishing closed the print edition of Maxim after 14 years.

Last year, Time Inc shut Nuts, the weekly that along with arch-rival Zoo shook up the men’s magazine market a decade ago.